5 Tips for the Uninspired Spiritual Seeker (Part 1)

Inspiration-wordsBy Wes Annac, Editor, Openhearted Rebel

I wrote the following for the 271st issue of the Weekly Awareness Guide, a written document distributed weekly via email that I offer for $11.11 a month. This is a preview of the article that appears in the guide.

Income from the guide helps me get by and ensures I can continue to offer free content, and every subscription is appreciated. The option to subscribe is given at the bottom of this post (learn about subscribing with cash/check here).

We could really use financial support this month, so if you like what we do here and you want to support the blog, consider subscribing to help us out.

As spiritual seekers, sometimes we lose our way. It becomes harder to find the light, and we become insecure about the unique ideas that used to fuel us. The inspiration that was once available in abundance becomes scarce as we find that we just aren’t as passionate about life as we used to be.

I’ve been down in this cavern of hopelessly lost inspiration, and as I climb back to the surface, I’d like to share some tips on how you can climb back up too. These tips might not work for everyone, but for me, they’ve been spiritual medicine. I hope they help you regain what you may have lost.

We’ll start with the most obvious tip, which you’ll find in nearly every article on this subject.

  1. Meditate and exercise more

I’d imagine some of you reading this have been meditating and exercising but still feel low. If this is the case for you, try doing them more and perhaps seeking an alternative approach.

You can try a different meditative practice, for example. There are hundreds of meditative practices you can learn about on the internet or in spiritual texts, and if you stick with just one, it might become uninteresting or repetitive.

A lot of people do the standard meditation where you sit, breathe deeply, become aware of your breath, and detach from your stream of thought. This is the most basic practice and not the only one by far. Do your research (we’ll discuss that later) and explore what might work better than what you’re already doing.

You can do the same with exercise: If possible, try riding a bike one day instead of jogging (or vice versa). Try something new, and your brain will reward you for shaking things up. In the process, you might discover something you enjoy a lot more.

  1. Run far, far away from your comfort zone
b946354167ed929d7bec2627266b4a5e-kahlil-gibran-comfortably-numb
Credit

There’s no gentle way to put this: Your comfort zone will slowly kill your inspiration if you stay there. This can especially be said for creative endeavors.

Let’s say you’ve found a new meditative practice or dreamt up a big new project that will take up most of your time and energy. Just as you’re about to start on this journey, you find out your favorite TV show just released a new episode. You now have a choice: start the new project or sit down, relax, and be entertained.

The first option will take you out of your comfort zone, whereas the second will keep you comfortable and require zero effort. But by the time the show is over and your TV is no longer stimulating the release of reward chemicals in your brain, you’ll be left wanting more, wishing the next episode was out and reflecting on your missed opportunity.

Ultimately, we know which path is better. But the better path is also the harder path.

This is because it feels good to be comfortable. So good, in fact, that most people choose to work uninspiring 9-5 jobs so they can come home in the evening and enjoy all the comforts of the modern world. They basically spend their lives in their comfort zone.

This stands in stark contrast to those who have a purpose and consistently pursue it. They work themselves to the bone because they’re inspired and no longer subjected to the limitations of their comfort zone.

comfort-zone
Credit

As the picture above states, all creative and spiritual “magic” happens outside your comfort zone. The interesting thing is that once you leave it behind, your range of comfort actually expands. You become comfortable doing things you never thought you’d attempt. Then, you can push the bar higher and explore the even more uncomfortable territory.

This is what all the great innovators throughout history have done – the people who really pushed society into new paradigms. You can do it too.

  1. Research topics that inspire you

In the search for lost inspiration, it might seem counterproductive to do something generally considered boring. Keeping your nose in a book all day might not be the most exciting prospect, but it can expand your mind and help you see the world differently.

I look at learning like this: As humans, our lack of knowledge limits us. We live with a severely handicapped worldview until we start to read, absorb knowledge, and learn about the world. The knowledge we accumulate shapes our understanding of life and, as we get older, influences the way we live.

In the same way that lifting weights will give you bigger muscles, reading and learning will expand your mind. We don’t celebrate intellectual strength as much as physical because as a society, we lack an understanding of how a person’s knowledge (or lack thereof) shapes who they are.

Reading and researching are tremendously valuable for spiritual seekers. After all, how can you expand your consciousness if you don’t give yourself the mental and emotional tools to do so? The same can be said for activists; how can you fight the latest illegally-constructed oil pipeline if you don’t know anything about it?

You’d be surprised at the effect research has on your worldview and your spiritual practices. If you feel spiritually empty, try looking through some books and learning some new things about the soul. Hopefully, you’ll find what you’ve been searching for.

Subscribe to the Weekly Awareness Guide to read the rest of this article. There are three subscription options: monthly, six-month, and one-year.

PayPal
$11.11 monthly subscription via credit, debit, or PayPal.
PayPal
Six-month Subscription for $59.99
PayPal
One-Year subscription for $122.22

Featured image credit

Advertisements

One thought on “5 Tips for the Uninspired Spiritual Seeker (Part 1)

  1. Pingback: Een interessant nieuw startpunt over New Age of een na-ijlende gesprek? | Aquarius

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.