Planetary Healing: Music in the Fourth Dimension

Written by Wes Annac, The Culture of Awareness.

I wrote the following for the ‘planetary healing’ section of The Aquarius Paradigm Weekly Newsletter, which I’m offering for $11.11 a month. Income from the newsletter helps my family and I get by, and the option to subscribe will be given at the bottom of this post.

This week, we’re going to examine what it’s like to be a musician/composer in the fourth dimension. We’ve already learned that the fourth dimension is a much freer and less inhibited place than the third, and this applies as much to writing and playing music as anything else.

Musicians and composers enjoy a greater level of freedom and ability than they’re usually blessed with on earth, and even though the talents of a lot of earthly composers are able to shine through, some people find too much difficulty playing or writing music here.

This isn’t so in the fourth dimension, where everything’s easier and more enjoyable, and as we’ll learn, there are plenty of musicians out there who actively write and play. I highly recommend pursuing music, which I call the sound of the soul, because it has a lot to offer our expanding minds and hearts.

Music has introduced me to incredibly pure states of consciousness more than once, and I’ll happily continue to practice it until I and we all are back in the higher realms, composing and playing glorious symphonies that the human mind can hardly fathom.

We have a lot to learn about music and the spiritual nature of sound, and hopefully, the fourth-dimensional account we’ll examine about it will teach us a thing or two.

The account we’re going to examine comes from Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson. It’s pretty long, so I’ll divine it into quotes with a little bit of information/opinion from me in between.

In his first quote, Monsignor tells us what it was like when he and one of his friends met two famous, deceased composers: Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky and Franz Joseph Hadyn.

“‘Call our friend Peter Ilyitch, Roger, and look for surprises.’ …

“We were shown into a spacious apartment that was both sitting-room and work-room. Close to a wide window there was a large table upon which were disposed many sheets of music-manuscript, some of which had already been written upon, while a further quantity of unused paper was ready waiting, and it was evidence that actual work was in progress.

“Along one wall was a commodious couch upon which an old friend of ours was seated and who rose upon our entrance. He was presented to Roger as Franz Joseph and then resumed his seat.” (1)

So far, Monsignor and Roger have entered Peter Ilyitch’s fourth-dimensional ‘apartment’ and met Franz Joseph face to face. They’ve seen Peter’s music sheets scattered wildly about, and Roger has been ‘formally’ introduced to Franz. Monsignor continues, outlining a conversation he then had with Peter Ilyitch.

“‘[Our friend] Roger does not suspect … who you are…. I’m sure he doesn’t know who Franz is either.’

“‘Well, you know, my dear, we have changed a little since we came here.’ …

“‘It amuses us greatly when we hear the announcement made on earth before a broadcast performance, that ‘this is the last work composed by so-and-so.’ The last work. Naturally, one knows what is meant, but it sounds so funny to us, especially when one glances at those shelves [full of music manuscripts]. …’” (2)

Apparently, it amuses Peter (and probably a lot of other deceased musicians) that our society’s so convinced death is the end of life that they’re quick to proclaim the last piece of music a composer wrote before passing on is their ‘last work’.

It certainly isn’t, and it’s interesting to think how many departed musicians continue to write songs in the realms beyond. Can you imagine hearing entire albums of new material from John Lennon; Jim Morrison; Kurt Cobain; Peter Tosh; Bob Marley?

It amazes me that all of these skilled musicians live on in other places, continuing to create their art for an audience of higher-dimensional souls to enjoy. Music is great here in the third dimension, but it must be much, much more wonderful and lighted in the realms beyond.

Clearly, higher-dimensional musicians work very hard, and if I was in a position where creating and playing music was much easier than it is on earth, I’d work hard too. The things I write basically flow through when I’m in the right state of mind/heart, and I like to think I work pretty hard on these reports.

We’re then told more about the departed musicians’ amusement at how our society has and continues to see them.

“‘That is why they put up statues and monuments to us, my dear friend’, said Franz Joseph. ‘They think we are finished and done for; not a note left in us. And now they are perfectly certain they know what was in our minds when we wrote any piece, large or small.

“If any of us had given the plain reason: to keep off starvation, they wouldn’t have approved of that. Not nearly mystic enough. Ah, well. This is the life.’” (3)

Here on earth, musicians, artists, etc. have to work to pay the bills and keep food on their plates, but in the fourth dimension and beyond, work is done purely for the sake of enjoyment and personal satisfaction. Music, which is liberating even on earth, is obviously no exception.

Music is written and played for the sheer enjoyment of writing and playing it, whereas here, it’s sometimes written so the writer can survive in this harsh, money-driven world. When he was asked what his hit song, “American Pie” means, Don McLean once said “it means I never have to work again”.

Plenty of musicians are following their passion and pursuing the sound of the soul, but they have to survive and most of them turn to music as a means to do so. I look forward to being in a state of consciousness that doesn’t require physical survival, and when we are, you can bet I’ll work harder than ever before, doing things that fill me with joy and wholeness.

Hopefully, the rest of you can say the same.

We deserve to be free, and in my opinion, we shouldn’t have to be too worried about physical survival to pursue things we’re passionate about. Every sovereign soul has the right to do things that fill them with joy and wholeness, but when physical survival distracts us, we’re kept from reclaiming this and myriad other sacred rights.

According to Peter Ilyitch, making music is much easier in the fourth dimension than it is on earth.

“‘Is it easier to compose music here or on earth?’ asked Roger.

“‘Oh, here, without a shadow of a doubt. Consider how free we are from everything that might be – and so often was – a hindrance. Franz mentioned starvation, for instance. Call it plain hunger in this case and all that it means. In other words, caring for necessary bodily wants. We’re entirely free of that.

“‘Public apathy – there’s something else that’s thankfully missing here. Difficulty of getting one’s works [heard] or acknowledged. No trouble about that either – here.’” (4)

Apparently, it’s easy for one’s music to become popular in the fourth dimension. I’m sure fourth-dimensional composers don’t have a shortage of listeners, because anyone who doesn’t write or play music probably listens to it with enthusiasm.

Something tells me most fourth-dimensional souls understand the role music plays in creating/sustaining our reality and helping us evolve, and the ones who don’t play music are probably very interested in hearing it.

I tend to write articles more than I play music, but that doesn’t soften my interest in it one bit. I’m happy to do what I can to support the artists and musicians who are helping awaken humanity, and no matter what realm I/we are in, that won’t change.

I don’t know about any of you, but I’ll always be interested in supporting artists and musicians. Music will only get better and better with each realm we reach, and personally, my support for it and those who are involved in it will continue to grow.

Franz tells us about the absence of negatively charged criticism in the realms beyond.

“Somewhere pleasant to live: this little place is an example. Franz lives in a delightful house where he is as happy ‘as the day is long.’” …

“‘No music critics,’ said Franz with a chuckle, ‘though fortunately for me I did not suffer much from those peculiar people. Not … that my music was perfect but because I lived at a period when musical criticism was not the subject for every ignoramus who thinks he knows something about music, as I believe is now the custom on earth.’” (5)

Criticism is definitely an earthy custom, and I think it’s unfortunate. Healthy criticism makes sense, but here on earth, we’re far too concerned with condemning people who could have something genuine to offer us if we opened up to them.

We live in a dog eat dog world, and a kindhearted person who only wants to get their art out could potentially face waves of criticism because their art doesn’t match what other people want it to match. It’s sad, but if you think about it, it really only holds the criticizers back from something that could’ve benefitted them.

If we’re too closed off to accept something or someone, we can’t benefit from it/them.

Acceptance is the way of the new world we’re creating, and we’ll have to be able to accept and encourage everyone’s talents. Everyone has something genuine, positive, and uplifting to offer, but we have to hear them out before we automatically criticize them.

Here we are at the end of this week’s planetary healing, and there’s still a lot to discuss about this subject.

We haven’t even finished Monsignor’s story, so we’ll pick this discussion back up next week and hear the rest of what he had to say. I’m certainly enjoying the discussion, and hopefully, it’s helping those of you who’ve wondered what writing and playing music is like in the realms beyond.

We haven’t learned very much about it yet, and of course, the best way to learn is by experience. When we’re back in the fifth dimension, we can perhaps peer into the fourth and see for ourselves what music is like there, but I think we’ll be far too absorbed in the music of the fifth to go to the trouble of looking.

We’ve talked about music in the fourth dimension, but I’d imagine music in the fifth is completely unfathomable. A lot of things about the fifth dimension are impossible to fathom from our current, limited perspective, but we’ll perceive its unfathomable wonders when we surpass the third and fourth dimensions.

For now, we’ll have to be content with what we’ve learned so far. We still have a ways to go before music’s greater relevance is recognized by all of humanity, but the rest of the world will wake up when they’re ready.

Footnotes:

  1. Monsignor Robert Hugh Benson through Anthony Borgia, medium, More About Life in the World Unseen. San Francisco: H.G. White, 1956; c1968, 127-33.
  2. Loc. cit.
  3. Loc. cit.
  4. Loc. cit.
  5. Loc. cit.

Photo Credit: OneDurango.com

This concludes this week’s planetary healing.

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2 thoughts on “Planetary Healing: Music in the Fourth Dimension

  1. Pingback: Wes Annac – Planetary Healing: Music In The Fourth Dimension – 30 May 2014 | Lucas 2012 Infos

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